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Hello Melissa,

I have seen your site several times in my search for a diffuser. I appreciate your insights and hard work. Thank you.

I am looking for a hot air diffuser that is relatively inexpensive. It just needs to support a relatively small area – my desk/office or where I sleep. I don’t need it to go through the whole house (although it’s fine for the scented air to drift, and it will, and that’s great).

I live in Pennsylvania where it is always cold and often damp. I want a hot air humidifier. My studies reveal that a hot air diffuser, or mixing pure essential oils (I buy them from Piping Rock, and they are great oils) will deteriorate the quality of the oil. That may be so but I want to accomplish two things:

1. Spread the healing energy of essential oils (e.g., sandalwood, patchouli, peppermint, tea tree,  Ylang-Ylang, to name a few).

2. Warm and humidify the air with a humidifier effect.

I just don’t know which diffuser to get. I have heard that the nebulizers are best for this but also that oils such as sandalwood don’t flow adequately, or block/jam.

Can you possibly please recommend a relatively inexpensive but quality unit that will serve my purposes? Or direct me to information about this?

I apologize for the long email. I also thank you very much for sharing your wisdom and knowledge with others.

By the way, the main purpose of my oils and the diffuser is to clarify, heal, uplift, calm and for meditation and focusing (I’m a writer), as well as to help the space smell exquisite.

Thank you again. Happy Holidays and best to you.

Sincerely,

Steven Hale

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Hi Steven,

 

You are at the right place for information. First off, there are no “hot air” diffusers.

You are talking about the nebulizer that uses no water. It uses 100% pure essential oils. It adds no moisture to the air because no water is used. It offers benefits from the particular oil you want with that oil’s fragrance. Most nebulizers can use heavier oils, but should the unit not disperse, clean the tube. I have no problems with mine.

The ultrasonic diffuser uses water. It can be used with or without essential oils to suit your purposes. Neither diffuser warms the air.

Then you talk about a “humidifier” a totally different product. They do not mist hot air either. The water vapor is emitted in a cool mist. If you want warm vapor, stand in a hot shower for that effect. A portable humidifier (not whole-house humidifier that is attached to the furnace) is large and typically used for babies, kids, and people who are sick with congestion.

The ultrasonic diffuser is probably the one you would want that will give you a small amount of humidity. Why do you want more moisture in humid Pennsylvania unless in the winter when the gas forced air furnace fan puts dry air into your environment? I, too, live in the humid Midwest USA. Ultrasonic diffusers use water that will add more humidity to the air, negative ions, can have LED lights, and shut off automatically.

If you want your house to be humid to the point of condensation on your windows, you might want to buy a portable humidifier and use in conjunction with a diffuser for its fragrance with oils and benefits.

Check out 6. Optimus U-31001 1.5-Gallon Cool-Mist Ultrasonic Humidifier that uses essential oils here. Read about all the different humidifiers on this page to find the one that benefits your needs.

Ultrasonic diffusers using water can be found here and nebulizers using only oil can be found here. I like the Verelily NOVA for only using oils put into the glass bottle included.

None of these is expensive. You can check the prices on Amazon.Com® by clicking the button.

Heat does destroy the essential oils and that is why they either use cold water or no water. There are no heating elements in diffusers.

I hope this information is helpful.

 

Best regards,

Melissa

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Hi Melissa,

Thanks for taking the time to respond with your thorough answers. For a few months, I have seen some/many of the units on Amazon and elsewhere, read many reviews, and will decide soon.

In response to steam/standing in front of the shower/humidity, well, actually I DO want it hot and humid. I’m from South Florida and love and miss the hot/warm humidity. In Pennsylvania, it’s cold and damp – it’s a totally different type of humidity – it’s just nasty damp. Big difference. And I do need steamy warm vapor to ease chronic nasal congestion. Peppermint essential oil works wonders, but I also want steam. (Yes, I have thought of building a steam room/sauna in the house, but it doesn’t seem like an option).

After reading your email, I think the answer for me is to buy a nebulizer for the essential oils and a warm air/mist humidifier to help me breathe better. Voila.

So, there it is…

Thanks again. Happy Holidays and keep up the good work.

Steven

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Hi Steven,

Since you want it hot and humid like Florida, you’ll have to live in a sauna during the Midwest winters. Having been to Miami and the Keys myself, I can understand the stifling difference. I prefer the dry high plains of semi-arid mountains myself. You just might have to build yourself a sauna and work in there! You can put a whole-house humidifier on your furnace and set it at a high humidity level. Or, put a pot of water to simmer on your cook stove. Hopefully, you don’t have a mold issue causing your congestion with that yucky mildew smell permeating your home.

I hope you find what works best for your preferred damp, clammy, and wet living environment. I prefer dry conditions. Read the reviews I’ve done here and hopefully, something will work for you.

Beneficial 100% essential oils for congestion are eucalyptus, lavender, lemon, lime, oregano, and peppermint that you now use; the antibacterial antiviral ones of cloves, marjoram, melaleuca (tea tree), thyme, sandalwood; and for mucus reduction cloves, cypress, ginger, melaleuca (tea tree), and thyme.

Best regards,

Melissa

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Hi Melissa,

Thanks for taking the time to respond with your thorough answers. For a few months I have seen some/many of the units on Amazon and elsewhere, read many reviews, and will decide soon.

In response to steam/standing in front of the shower/humidity, well, actually I DO want it hot and humid. I’m from South Florida and love and miss the hot/warm humidity. In Pa. it’s cold and damp – it’s a totally different type of humidity – it’s just nasty damp. Big difference. And I do need steamy warm vapor to ease chronic nasal congestion. Peppermint essential oil works wonders, but I also want steam. (Yes, I have thought of building a steam room/sauna in the house, but it doesn’t seem like an option).

After reading your email, I think the answer for me is to buy a nebulizer for the essential oils and a warm air/mist humidifier to help me breathe better. Voila.

So there it is…

Thanks again. Happy Holidays and keep up the good work.

Steven

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Hi Melissa,

Thank you for your detailed answers in your response (last month). I still haven’t figured out which exact unit(s) to buy.

And I DO want a hot air. I am from South Florida and I miss the humidity and warmth. As you well understand, it’s so cold here in Pa. most of the year, and the temperature drops about 30 degrees or so every night. My body prefers warm humid air.

My solution might be to buy a high quality nebulizer for my essential oils, and also a vaporizer for steamy, humid air… That way I can get the best of both worlds without destroying the oils.

And, no, it isn’t convenient to always stand in the shower. Yes, one or two showers a day, but what about the rest of the time? I guess you were kidding?

Thanks again for taking the time to answer my questions.

Steven

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